Oct 232014
 

flesh_and_iron By Endzeitgeist

This racial supplement clocks in at 15 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/SRD, leaving us with 13 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

We kick of this book with the Prometheans. These guys and gals thankfully have nothing to do with the ridiculously bad sci-fi movie and its clumsily disguised anti-science propaganda, but rather hearkens to the standard set by White Wolf to describe Prometheans as an euphemism for the created/artificial species – -or rather, for golem-like races.

Here, we make a distinction between cobbled-together Flesh Prometheans in the vein Frankenstein’s Monster, who receive +2 Con adn Int, -2 Wis, can sniff out carrion (and those severely wounded), have darkvision 60 ft, ferocity, may 1/day tap into old memories of one of their parts to get an insight bonus equal to their character level to a skill, get +2 to saves versus diseases and poisons and are healed by negative energy and harmed by positive energy as a drawback (or bonus in the apocalyptic world of Obsidian Apocalypse). All in all, a solid race, with the energy affinity making for a nice tip .in the high-powered OA-default environment, this is a bonus, in a regular setting probably a hindrance. Nice take on the Half-undead race.

The second type of Prometheans would be the Clockwork Prometheans – or, to give you a better understanding – brains-in-a-jar in power-armors. Yeah. Awesome concept. These fellows receive +2 Str and Int, -2 Dex are slow, receive resistance 5 against negative energy, lose no hp when they gain a negative level and also receive a +2 bonus to saves versus death-effects, energy drain, negative energy and necromancy spells and SPs. They also receive a +2 natural armor and +2 to saves versus disease, mind-affecting effects, poisons and exhaustion/fatigue-inducing effects. They need non eat, sleep or breathe. They are considered half-constructs and cannot be raised or resurrected. Both receive the Promethean subtype and the clockwork Prometheans are also rather strong (and not suitable for low powered gaming), but fit in well within the context of Obsidian Apocalypse’s high-stakes gaming. That being said, if you don’t bat an eye at the ARG-races, these probably won’t prove too much either.

Gaining weaponiszed weapon-grafts (or if you’re a machinesmith, even mobius weapons), shutting temporarily down all emotion, stopping bleed effects, natural attacks – okay feat options. Now personally, I don’t like the automatic detection of magical auras and undead one of the feats grants – auto-detects tend to result in broken in-game logic. The race comes with favored class options, which suffer in parts from minor glitches – like “Gain a +1/2 bonus to rolls to critical hits while raging.” Yeah, not all crits are meant – there’s a “confirm” missing here. +1 to CMD versus two maneuvers of your choice is cool, though I would have appreciated information on whether these can be taken again with different maneuvers or whether the bonus always applies to the same two maneuvers. Nice to see – FCOs for both Machinesmith and psionic classes.

Now the spirit-of-vengeance-possessed Raijin, absent from the basic OA-book also make a return. They receive -2 Cha, a Die Hard-like effect (with synergy with the feat), +2 to will-saves and fort-saves, treat any part of their body/weapons/armor as +1 for the purpose of bypassing DR and their possessing spirit receives an ego and follows the rules for magic items – smart. Instead of being a base-race, the Raijin is essentially a story-reward, perhaps the result of a story-feat etc.A total of 7 feats accompany the race and allows the Raijin to affect the minds of otherwise immune mindless undead. Slightly annoying – the cool and iconic, if a bit powerful option to control creatures via possession sports quite a number of easily avoidable editing glitches that make the ability slightly harder to understand than it ought to be. Personally, I think this feat requires a kind of daily limit – control of foes via touch as a supernatural ability sans limit is rather powerful even before further augmenting the ability with supplemental feats. A final feat allows you to make necromancy-spells sickening.

The final race would be the Uzamati-and they are weird – they have darkvision 60 ft., are immune to poison, sleep, paralysis, disease, nausea, fatigue and exhaustion and the sickened condition. Uzamati are healed by negative energy as if they were undead, but unlike undead or constructs, they have con-scores and need to make fort-saves. They also heal damage normally, are not immune to mind-influencing effects, are subject to critical hits, nonlethal damage, stun, ability damage and drain and death/necromancy-effects. As beings of pure negative energy, the Uzamati cannot be raised or resurrected and do not need to sleep, eat or drink. They also get +2 to Int, Wis or Cha and Necromantic Phasing as a bonus feat. …which should simply be part of the race write-up, since every Uzamati gets it.

This feat nets you the ability to phase away for cha-level + chosen mental attribute modifier rounds per day. While phased out, they receive half damage from corporeal damage sources., may phase through and enter solid objects, deal +1 negative energy damage with unarmed attacks that cannot heal the Uzamati or other negative energy-healing creatures. Foes trying to perceive you receive a penalty of -2 to perception and using the ability on a plane “That has a strong negative energy makes you vulnerable to all damage.” So…does this mean double damage from everything? +50% damage? What constitutes strong negative energy? The planar trait for strong negative energy affinity? Don’t know. There are also 4 traits – one of which makes it possible to be healed by positive/negative energy normally…which is weird, for the racial traits specify that these do work normally on you. Something went wrong here. For just a feat, channel energy can have all dice upgraded to d8, which is too strong and phased out damage-increase to d6 is okay, as is affecting incorporeal creatures. Phasing through walls is also awesome.

The Uzamati as a people of artificially created body-simulacra for negative energy-bound souls are a downright awesome concept. I also like quite a few of their rules and the phasing is cool – but since it’s essentially an outsourced racial power, it does far too much at once – had this feat been split up into multiple feats and the race studded with some vulnerability, it would be utterly awesome – as written, it is an overpowered beast that imho even transcends the power-level of the strong Obsidian Apocalypse races with the vast array of unnecessary immunities. Fixable? Sure.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, but not glorious. There are quite a few glitches in here that could have been easily caught, but formal ones and in the rules-language. The pdf adheres to a drop-dead-gorgeous 2-column standard and the ridiculously awesome artworks, all of them originals (though two have been used before in Obsidian Apocalypse) make this one of the most beautiful pdfs out there, especially for the low asking price. The pdf has no bookmarks, which is a minor comfort detriment.

Authors Rich Redman and Wendall Roy have created an array of truly inspired races that all breathe high-concept awesomeness. The balance in respect to the Obsidian Twilight-versions, where available, has been significantly mproved, though imho, there are still some hick-ups and feature-bloat, especially with the Uzamati, to be found here. These races are not for low-powered games, be aware of that. While the Uzamati could use a nerfing, the other races are high-concept and damn cool. On the downside, we get no FCOs for the Uzamati and no age, height and weight tables for ANY of the new races, which is a major detriment in my book – especially knowing how much the massive Prometheans weigh would have been more than crucial; Raijin and Uzamati can be explained by just adhering to base creature/human defaults.

This pdf has all the makings of greatness and awesomeness and falls short by a small margin – with the Uzamati’s balance-issues, glitches and missing age, height and weight tables conspiring to make this slightly less than its awesome concepts deserve. My final verdict will hence clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 for the purpose of this platform due to the high-concept, cool ideas and with an explicit recommendation if you’re looking for strong races, are willing to do a bit of crunch-balancing or just in love with the cool concepts.

Endzeitgeist out.

If you have enjoyed this RPG review, please consider becoming a patron in Patreon to help support this website, podcast and video channel.

Races of Obsidian Apocalypse: Flesh and Iron is available from:

drivethrurpg_logo423333337343 patreon3222

Remember you can follow us on Twitter and Google+!

Thank you for your support.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Oct 232014
 

126930[1] By Endzeitgeist

This Mythic Mini clocks in at 3 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page SRD, 1 page content, so let’s take a look, shall we?

This time, we’re all about feats of protection, so let’s check this out!

Okay, unsurprisingly, this pdf offers mythic versions of the “bodyguard” and “In Harm’s Way”-feats, with the former not requiring you to threaten foes to help your allies and even use mythic power to reach them, whereas “In Harm’s Way”‘s mythic version allows you to use AoOs to intercept attacks, taking the effects upon yourself – this means no AC-tanking per my reading, though the feat could use some tighter wording as to whether the intercepted attack has to hit your AC as opposed to the one of your ally. While this remains a slight blemish, I did enjoy what these two feats do – i.e. offer a mythic version of the base feats that indeed feel distinct in what they do, not just like some generic mythified feat.

The further increased AoE of “combat patrol” doesn’t look like that much on paper, but in-game is rather significant – especially the further reach-increases with higher tiers. Personally, I’m not too big a fan of the first increase by +5 feet at 5th tier, but that may stem from being very conservative with reach and the like – too many deadly builds possible that way. “Coordinated” and “covering defense”‘s mythic versions as feats make for great defensive feats, with the former especially breathing the spirit of military units and scenes like the rain of arrows in 300, so yeah, neat.

“Defensive Weapon Training’s” mythic version allows you to further increase your prowess versus the respective weapon group ad maneuvers initiated against you with it, even allowing you to share half the bonus granted by the feat with allies. Favored Defense on the other hand allows you to extend the bonus granted to adjacent allies – there’s an insane component here, though. The bonus granted by favored defense is a dodge bonus and the ability to, upon taking the feat twice, extend the bonus over a significant range would allow a unit of rangers to stack it through the roof. Not something that happens too often, admittedly, but still – could have been slightly more elegant here.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn’t notice any significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games 2-column full-color standard and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Jason Nelson has taken a difficult topic with defensive feats, mainly because the game per se isn’t that great in this regard. That being said, the mythic versions of these feats make sense, often vastly surpassing their base feats in tactical capabilities. While generally, teh feats are vastly superior to the base ones, they do stumble here and there slightly, even when taking the increased power-potential of mythic gameplay into account. Still, a nice, fun array of feats for a low price and hence well worth 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

If you have enjoyed this RPG review, please consider becoming a patron in Patreon to help support this website, podcast and video channel.

Mythic Minis 13: Feats of Protection is available from:

drivethrurpg_logo423333337343 patreon322

Remember you can follow us on Twitter and Google+!

Thank you for your support.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Oct 212014
 

127677-thumb140[1]By Endzeitgeist

This pdf clocks in at 32 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page how-to-use, 1 page ToC (including CR/MR), 1 page SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 24 pages of raw content, so let’s take a look, shall we?

Now while this book is intended to provide additional adversaries to the Wrath of the Righteous AP, it should be noted that more so than many other Adventure-path-plug-ins, this book and the villains herein do in no way need this connection and can easily be introduced into non-AP contexts – especially due to not making that heavy use of the Mythic Adventures-rules, meaning that even non-mythic campaigns get their due with this pdf.

So what kind of adversaries do we get herein? Well, the first would be the Unique Quasit-bound demon sorceror Terracg p nmvczy. No. Not a Typo. I didn’t fall asleep at the keyboard. In a cool twist, this creature’s name is also written in a strange , glyph-like font that makes identifying its proper name hard. Now the catch is – this creature is the fragment of a greater demon and is usually encountered as something saved from demons – becoming a kind of foul-mouthed sidekick for its mortal masters, one with a keen intellect…and one that is nigh impossible to get rid of. BRILLIANT. The additional hooks provided further cement this creature as something I will gift my PCs with…

Koyo-Shojaxus is a more straightforward adversary – at CR 13, the babau martial artist 7 makes for a deadly adversary and a vile variant of the wandering martial artist-trope. Neat! The CR 13 succubus gunslinger (mysterious stranger) Lilevyrrin gives new meaning to the moniker of femme fatale by pairing both deadly prowess and her succubus heritage’s “needful things”-style manipulation-capabilities into a glorious package of mayhem. And that’s before her Glabrezu lover/mortal enemy enters the fray…

Malcaedix, the shadow demon rogue, takes one of the most powerful creatures for its CR and amps it up to CR 10, adds a new feat for better possession and makes for a strange creature – unlike many demons, she is subtle. She actually cares for her hosts and does her best to eliminate threats to her host…which may include any and all people said person cared about or even those that mildly offended the creature. As a kind of dark guardian angel, she also doesn’t deal well with rejection, meaning you’ll better be able to fend her off if you question all the good things that happen to you… Awesome and the potential for actual deep, psychological conflict and moral questions as well as roleplaying is vast here.

Ser Meridrand Palisard, the disgustingly fat human antipaladin/low templar with an implanted demonic graft for a stomach makes for a truly vile and disgusting cannibalistic foe, who further adds to this imagery with his equipment -a disgusting, bloated individual, a fallen champion and deadly to boot at CR 15, this erstwhile paragon is a great adversary for a “Through a mirror, darkly”-type situation, when the PCs realize how fragile the sanctity of their alignment truly is and how easily they, too, can fall into the clutches of the Abyss and its servants.

Mons’ Verix, the CR 16 Glabrezu-summoner also has a very cool twist – his eidolon looks like an angel. With this tool of deceit, the creature may fool even the most stalwart of heroes and lead them on the first steps of the downward spiral of temptation if played properly – a cool idea indeed ad with all the magic capabilities of the creature, one supplemented by the proper magical oomph! As a minor complaint, the final page of his entry is half empty – more story could have easily fitted in there.

Now so far, we’ve had next to no possession – so what about a demon-possessed inquisitor/assassin build with the erstwhile witch hunter Count Ulus VonKaval? It should be noted that the count is the one character herein who does not get an awesome, original piece of full color artwork, but that does not detract from this example how pride vo make even the mightiest fall.

Finally, at CR 15/MR 6, Dasnikynlin, the mythic coluxus demon with the awesome artwork, its mesmerizing drone, charisma damage AND bleed-damage causing bite, death attack and vicious mythic spell-like abilities makes for a powerful final entry, though one that could have used a unique story-expansion herein.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches herein. Layout adheres to Legendary Games fiery, slightly orange-tinted standard for Wrath of the Righteous-plug-ins and the pdf comes with bookmarks for your convenience. The artworks deserve special mentioning here, for almost all adversaries receive their own, glorious full-color pieces, sometimes even on a full-page spread.

Alistair Rigg, Todd Stewart, Clinton J. Boomer and Nicholas Logue – notice something – yeah, these guys have in common that they know how to WRITE. I don’t mean “write a supplement”, but really WRITE. Evoke moods, atmospheres and multilayered characters. It’s easy to delve into the “wants to destroy everything due to being EVUUUL”-trope with demons and the adversaries herein almost universally manage to avoid this, instead being round, nasty individuals that make sense in a twisted way, providing roleplaying opportunities aplenty, not just within the context of Wrath of the Righteous.

In fact, the writing is so good that you really, really want to use these villains – almost immediately. This miniature rogue’s gallery definitely provides some of the most depraved adversaries I’ve seen in a while – and that is meant as a compliment. But that wouldn’t be enough if their statblocks were bland or boring. They aren’t. While not all statblocks reach the level of complexity I tend to enjoy in NPC-builds, a couple of them do and that, coupled with the awesome writing, is enough for me. Add to that the slight touches – like aforementioned glyphs, like demonic trysts gone wrong, the evocative adventure hooks – and we have a grand collection of villains, well worth 5 stars + seal of approval – legendary indeed!

Endzeitgeist out.

If you have enjoyed this RPG review, please consider becoming one of our Patreon sponsors. Every little bit helps a great deal!

Unrighteous Villains is available from:

drivethrurpg_logo423333337343 patreon4222

Remember you can follow us on Twitter and Google+!

Thank you for your support.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Oct 062014
 

Verse-ArcanumBy Endzeitgeist

Gossamer Worlds-Verse Arcanum clocks in at 10 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, leaving us with 8 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So what is the Verse Arcanum? In one sentence, I’d describe it as “ye old fantasy setting” – elves, dwarves, magic galore, curses, prophecies and adventurers – fey and miles-long wyrms (true dragons in the most lethal, city-levelling sense…) and just about all other things and creatures you know from these settings can be found in this UNIVERSE (not just world!). Rainbow bridges? Check. Nasty Umbra-worshipping subterranean dwarves that specialize in unmaking magic? Check. Dual-natured elves that are at once light and dark elves? Yup.

Now of course, in the context of Lords of Gossamer and Shadows, the Verse Arcanum works differently – each Lord (or Lady) may erect one tower and said tower acts as his/her domain – no total control to be gained here. The influence of the tower and the respective ruler is felt via the demesne, or domain of said tower, in which the respective ruler controls the land. Now logically, this is not something most locals are keen on – and adventurers questing to take down the wizard’s tower, annoyingly self-righteous paladins…here’s the chance to hurl all those characters back at the players…

Beyond world trees containing whole worlds and civilizations, wizard academies and the like, the Verse Arcanum offers potential galore for a more meta approach to fantasy gaming.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn’t notice any glitches. Layout adheres to Rite Publishing’s full-color two-column standard for LoGaS-supplements and the pdf comes with glorious, thematically fitting original pieces of artwork. The pdf comes excessively bookmarked, which is nice to see, even at such a short length!

Matt Banach’s Verse Arcanum is at once very conservative and one might argue, not as unique as some of his other creations. On the other hand, it could be seen as creative by its trope-inversion, by its essentially post-fantasy-gaming perspective on traditional fantasy tropes and as such, has quite some merit. Now one thing that personally didn’t wholyl gel with me would be the focus of this Gossamer World – it’s a universe, I get it. But why not devote a larger source book to it? The wyrms, for example, being the awesome beasts that they are, could have used some stats in the context of LoGaS and the dualistic nature of elves, dwarves etc. almost begs for an array of unique cantrips, spells etc. to learn. The tower defense angle is also rather awesome, but more concise effects on the demesne et al would have been awesome.

Don’t get me wrong, this is a great book, but it also is essentially a teaser-level pdf that can only go into so much detail for an idea that is slightly too much for the constraints of the pdf. Unlike other Gossamer Worlds, this is more about the twists on fantasy in the context of LoGaS, not about playing grounds, and it just doesn’t follow up on the ideas with proper effects.

Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 due to the low price point and awesome production values.

Endzeitgeist out.

If you have enjoyed this RPG review, please consider becoming one of our Patreon sponsors. Every little bit helps a great deal!

Gossamer Worlds: Verse Arcanum is available from:

drivethrurpg_logo423333337343 patreon422

Remember you can follow us on Twitter and Google+!

Thank you for your support.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Oct 012014
 

Adventure Quarterly 5By Endzeitgeist

The fifth installment of Adventure Quarterly, Rite Publishing’s spiritual successor to Dungeon magazine, clocks in at 73 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD and 1 page back cover, leaving us with 68 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

The editorial by Robert N. Emerson already shows and the subsequent adventures do as well – Rite Publishing’s Kickstarter to amp further up the quality of the magazine was a full success – beyond the full color art throughout this magazine, it is especially the cartography, which has benefited extremely – Rite Publishing overlord Steven D. Russell did not pinch any pennies budget-wise here: The cartography in this book is rendered in stunning, gorgeous full color by the hands of Tommi Salama. If you’re by any chance not yet familiar with him – he’s imho the heir to Jonathan Roberts. Yes, that beautiful. So production-value wise, we get a steep step upwards, so let’s see whether the modules themselves hold up to the art, shall we?

The following is a short overview of the 3 modules herein, which necessarily means the text contains SPOILERS. Potential players are advised to skip to the conclusion, especially since the modules herein tend to be a bit…let’s say unconventional.

First of which would be Mike Welham’s level of Ruins Perilous, this time intended for level 3. What is “Ruins Perilous”? It’s Rite Publishing’s serialized mega-dungeon, situated near the city of adventurers, Questhaven. Beyond being a mega-dungeon, it’s also a kind of testing ground for adventurers and a means of increasing one’s status within the hierarchy of the adventurer-governed city. As such, the dungeon is lethal, but also a kind of hyperreal simulacrum – essentially, post-modern dungeon-crawling. The created nature of the dungeon allows for some interesting tricks indeed and both ratfolk populace and the other challenges herein fit this theme rather well – whether it would be the traps or the required guild forge to properly add the clout to show they’ve “completed” this level – the strange nature of the dungeon is well-reflected here. One of the crucial differences here would be that the forge this time around is easy to find – but in the form of an organ and furthermore, locked – to activate it, the PCs will have to brave sense-themed encounters, which include giant skunks and an lion consisting of sonic energy. An interesting dungeon level indeed, though one that could have easily been made even more memorable by providing an stronger tie to the theme of senses: What if each key required the sacrifice of one sense, albeit temporarily? Blinding the ranged fighter, depriving the rogue of the sense of touch, making the scout deaf, that sort of thing? As a kind of didactic lesson for adventurers that they have to depend on their allies to help? I once used this ploy in an adventure of mine and my players loved it – even the spellcaster, when he was muted and I required him to roleplay or write interactions… As written, the level has a strong theme, but one that is, at least for my taste, not pronounced enough and thus misses a treasure trove of roleplaying opportunities to supplement the roll-playing dungeon exploration.

Michale Allen’s “Legacy of the Fishermage” (for level 9 characters) is an adventure, mood-wise, after my tastes: The sage Muchadha was after the regularly (every 500 years) respawning “Salmon of Truth” – last time, he was foiled by his apprentice, who, by burning his thumb on the fat, accidentally got the salmon’s wisdom, thus becoming a wise, but thumb-sucking hero. Yeah, this adventure is kind of goofy. The fishermage is gone, but now an ogre has stolen clues pertaining to the locale of the returned salmon and the players are on the brute’s trail, alongside the friendly (as far as dwarves go) goblin-converting priest Ruag the Daft. To emerge victorious from this quest, the PCs will have to deduce the truth behind the legends, riddles, explore the fishermage’s grotto (and defeat his failed, second apprentice…no longer human) and finally, track the ogre and confront the salmon. Yeah, confront. The salmon can turn into huge size and is rather deadly – death by salmon is surely a fate most players will try to avoid, if only to avoid all the cackling… All in all, a fun, uncommon adventure with a lot of winks, a good variety of roleplaying, combat and using one’s brains and plenty maps and intriguing terrain to support it – nothing to complain here!

The high-level module here, for level 18 characters, is provided by Tricky Owlbear Publishing’s Bret Boyd – and if the title “Paradox” isn’t enough of an indicator, yes, time-travel is included. 1300 years ago, the archmage Delgoon created an artifact that broke down the boundaries of the planes and time itself, the sphere of ages. Yeah, a McGuffin, but wait a second – another caveat: The module is a campaign ending event – or alternatively, a complete game-changer. Why? Because the PCs visit an archeological dig, where they find statues of themselves – more than a millennium old. A sphere subsequently transports the PCs back in time – to the apocalypse they obviously…stopped and no one recalls? As the planar boundaries in the past come crushing down, the PCs have to find a way to diffuse the situation and stop the collapse. Over the course of this, the PCs are hurtled through time to undo their greatest regrets, to get a second chance…to vanish with the sphere, have the apocalypse undone and perhaps even return. And this is where the module, for me, kind of necessarily falls a bit apart. I once had a time-travel plot in my campaign and planned it for years, setting up blank spaces, mysterious happenstances etc – a DM is advised to do so for this as well. The emotional impact of the module hinges a bit on that. Beyond this, there’s another problem – the suggestion to undo things – that’s not how time-travel works.

Changing the past changes all from this point onwards, preventing potentially (or at least, modifying) the choices that led up to the PCs getting to the point of time travel in the first place, preventing them from enjoying the benefits. It’s the crucial conundrum of time travel and the module’s “satisfying” reward for the PCs breaks this one tenet. To take an example – what if a paladin’s regret was being unable to save a king? Now, he manages it and dies. No war erupts, thousands don’t die, friends and allies perhaps perish due to the paladin not being there to save them… even beyond the conundrum mentioned, the decisions influence the other players and even if the conundrum is ignored, the nature of collective adventuring is weird and at the very latest, here timelines diverge. So if your PCs screwed up a world’s canon big time, that’s a nice way to hit the history eraser button – but whether your players are okay with that…best be sure to check that, otherwise the implied undoing of their deeds or the sloppy “PCs are still around, in spite of changes”-ending stratagem could frustrate you to no end. Now don’t get me wrong, this module isn’t bad, but it fails to live up to the logic of its own gimmick by falling prey to the problematic past modification bug. Then again, your players might not care – I know mine would and I’d never, ever hear the end of it. That being said, with high-CR Aeons, chain gun studded lion robots and several other damn cool high-CR critters, many of which with their own artwork, this module still has quite a bit to scavenge.

Next up would be a short encounter by Creighton Broadhurst of Raging Swan Press, providing the complex haunting of spectral orcs and the treasure they guard. Steven D. Russell also provides open sandbox advice, (including some nods towards cool 3pp-supplements) – this time, all focused on getting instant NPCs (and how to handle statblocks, art, etc.) and where to scavenge them from -including a cool multiclass CR 15 sample build.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn’t notice any significant glitches. Layout adheres to Rite Publishing’s two-column full-color standard and, as mentioned, the copious original pieces of artwork and cartography render this a good premium product – no complaints on the production values side of things. The issue also comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks, with high-res jpgs of the 9 (!!!) maps – but not including key-less version of all maps – a minor complaint here.

This one’s hard – on the one hand, the increase in massive production values helps and amps up the bang-for-buck ratio by quite a bit. I’m a big fan of Mike Welham’s writing and the concept of the dungeon, but I also felt that this module did not make full use of its theme, falling slightly short of excellence. Michael Allen’s module is hilarious and fun and gets two thumbs up from me, as do the supplemental articles and the monsters of the last module. On the other hand, at least for me, the final module doesn’t work – at all. It’s the, to quote the doctor, “Wibbly-wobbly” concept I just can’t get myself to…like. (Yes, I know I’ll be booed by plenty people out there…) – Time travel is NOT something simple and the module fails to address the consequences properly. And yes, I’m aware that for quite a few people, how the module handles it is no problem – but every time, Doctor Who time-travel starts, I gnash my teeth (in spite of actually loving the series, so put away the pitchforks…). I’m more of a Primer kind of guy. But I *know* that for some of you out there, it will be a huge of an issue as it is for me.

Now usually, my gut reaction would be to rate this issue slightly more down than I would – but on the other hand, my gripes with it are admittedly kind of subjective – the realization of untapped potential, the way time travel is handled…you can have radically different opinions on these. Especially the former – your players might actually loathe the suggestion I posited above…or they might love it. In the same manner, your players might actually enjoy the final module in here and with some copious DM foreshadowing, it won’t feel abrupt. So yeah, if you were shaking your head at my complaints (and want the creatures, the awesome second module or get these just to scavenge parts or the glorious maps…), go get this. If you found yourself nodding, detract one star. Since my policy is in dubio pro reo, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.

If you have enjoyed this RPG review, please consider becoming a patron in Patreon to help support this website, podcast and video channel. Every click helps us a great deal!

Mythic Minis 22: Mythic Martial Arts II is available from:

drivethrurpg_logo423333337343 patreon322

Remember you can follow us on Twitter and Google+!

Thank you for your support.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Sep 302014
 

Mythic Minis 22By Endzeitgeist

All right, you know the drill, Mythic Minis 22: Mythic Martial Arts II¬†contains – 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/SRD, 1 page content, so let’s take a look!

This Mythic Mini about martial arts provides 6 new mythic martial arts, so what do we get?

  • Boar Style: Tear flesh more than once per round, also versus multiple adversaries, provided you hit the target twice. Expend mythic power to deal con damage. Ouch! Awesome!
  • Boar Ferocity: Add 1/2 tier to Boar ferocity’s demoralize duration. Additionally, if the target would be shaken for 4 rounds or more, you may exchange 4 of these for 1 round of the nauseated condition. Use mythic power to make the target frightened instead. AWESOME! That’s what I’m talking about!
  • Boar Shred: +1/2 mythic tier bleed, use mythic power for con-bleed. Nasty!
  • Crane Style: Better defense, enter crane style as if fighting defensively as an immediate action. Keep threatening AoOs, but at -2 to atk. Neat.
  • Crane Riposte: +1/2 mythic tier on AoOs with Crane Riposte. Additionally, when hit while fighting defensively in crane wing, make a retaliation attack either via AoO or as an immediate action. This is very iconic.
  • Crane Wing: Expend mythic power to extend Crane Wing to more attacks on a 1 for 1 basis. Also potentially force attacks directed on you on other creatures. Cool!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn’t notice glitches. Layout adheres to legendary Games 2-column full-color standard and the cover-art is neat. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Alistair Rigg, after the first pdf on martial arts, may deliver slightly less content here, but each and every mythic feat of these styles ROCKS. They take the base concept of the styles and make them work in much more awesome ways for a glorious pdf for martial artists – well worth a full-blown recommendation of 5 stars + seal of approval!

Endzeitgeist out.

If you have enjoyed this RPG review, please consider becoming a patron in Patreon to help support this website, podcast and video channel. Every click helps us a great deal!

Mythic Minis 22: Mythic Martial Arts II is available from:

drivethrurpg_logo423333337343 patreon32

Remember you can follow us on Twitter and Google+!

Thank you for your support.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)